The effect of BFR on pain and proprioception soccer players with chronic ankle instability  
Poster Presentation XML
Authors
1university of Raja , Qazvin , Iran
2Assistant professor of Department of physical education and sport science, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran
Abstract
In this study, the effect of blood flow restriction (BFR) on pain, proprioception of soccer players with chronic ankle instability was investigated.
research methodology: The method of this study is quasi-experimental, and the statistical population of this study is football and adolescent soccer league in Karaj. Subjects were randomly assigned into two experimental and control groups.Finally, all subjects entered the research with full knowledge of the purpose and method of research and with complete consent. First, the Shapiro-Wilk test for the normality of the data distribution, and then for the inferential data analysis, repeated measure ANOVA and paired t-test for research variables with SPSS software version 22 with the least significant difference at the level (P <0.05) was analyzed.
Results: There was a significant difference between the mean of the control group and the experimental group in pain variable (P = 0.001) and between the pre-test and post-test in the experimental group (P = 0.029). But in the sense of proprioception , there was no significant difference between the experimental and control groups (P = 0.552). In the experimental group, there was no significant difference between pre-test and post-test (P> 0.05).
Conclusion: Overall, BFR training had a significant effect on pain, but it did not affect proprioception. Also, since balance disorder is caused by ankle injury, doing active exercises can disrupt balance and re-sprint in people, especially teens and teens. BFR training can be an acceptable way to improve performance in athletes because of their lower intensity (20-30%) and the ability to work on all muscles, as a treatment in their rehabilitation program.
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