Comparison of decision-making and visual search behavior of expert and novice players in position of 5 vs. 5 attacks.
Oral Presentation XML
Authors
1Assistant Professor of Islamic Azad University Firoozkooh Branch. Tehran. Iran.
2Assistant Professor at Sport Sciences Research Institute of Iran
3Professor at University of Imam Hossein, Tehran, Iran
4Lecturer at Farhangian University of Amir Kabir Alborz
Abstract
The mechanisms involved in expert performance have been the focus of many researchers. One of these mechanisms is visual skills. Many researchers have tried to compare these skills among skilled and beginner athletes to provide different solutions to enhance their expert performance. The purpose of this study was to compare the decision-making and visual search behavior of Novice and expert football players in position of 5 vs. 5.
attacks.Participants included 14 novice male soccer players with an average age of 22.5 years and 14 expert male soccer players with an average age of 27.4 years. Expert players were among the 16 Iranian Premier League teams who voluntarily participated in the study. Novice players were among those who played leisurely and had never participated in any official matches. Both groups observed 5 attack vs. 5 attack mice. They then announced their decision, which included four pass choices by the ball-striker. At the same time, visual search behavior was assessed with the visual detector. Independent T-test was used to evaluate decision-making, saccade movements, number and time of fixations. Equality of variances was used by Levon's test.
Results showed that there was a significant difference in decision making between the two groups of expert and novice players (P <0.05). There was no significant difference in saccade movements, number and time of fixation between the two groups of expert and novice players (P <0.05).
Expert soccer players may be able to extract more relevant decision-making information from the same visual field as compared to the novice player that will help to make more accurate decisions.
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